My Windsor Project Blog

Customer Project- Kitchen Island Made from a Slab of Live Edge Parota

Kitchen-Parto-slabThe following picture sent in from Windsor Plywood Langley store. It features a kitchen island made from a slab of Parota live edge. Looks fantastic!

Parota is also known as Guanacaste, Raintree or Kelobra is like Acacia in appearance but easier in workability. A fast growing hardwood that is popular with bowl turners, carvers, furniture/cabinetry designers and boat builders.  More pictures and information can be found at the Windsor Plywood website.

Bathroom Renovation – mywindsorproject contest entry

A bathroom reno by Mark and Karen

“The materials we used for the reno are as follows:
• 4 1/2″ MDF flat stock
• #497 at the bottom of the wall.
• Bead board paneling. Sold in 30 or 32″ X 48″ sections.
• Another strip of the 4 1/2″ flat stock.
• A strip of MDF Base cape #3714 set 1/2″ down from the top.
• Pine corner cove #3266 in all inside corners.
• Pine corner moulding #202 on the out side corners.
• The frame for the mirror is MDF casing #381.
• The upper moulding I believe is Crown #051

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Kitchen Renovation by Alvin – mywindsorproject contest entry

Kitchen Renovation: re-surface some existing cabinets and built some new ones to change the kitchen configuration.  Cabinets and crown moulding done in Cherry.  Added soft close hinges to upper cabinets.  New glass backslash, new granite countertops, new lighting and new flooring throughout.

Before: Light Oak Cabinets


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After: Medium Cherry Cabinets
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Window Flower Box Project

Window-Box-assembledWindow Flower Box Project

Does the exterior of your home need a little dressing up? This window flower box is so easy you can make two or three in a few hours. So build a couple now and try your hand at planting some fall varieties of flowers or make it a winter workshop project.

1. Purchase flower box tray inserts made of fibreglass reinforced plastic.

2. Purchase 1″ x 6″ pressure treated or Western Red Cedar wood.

3. Cut from 1″ x 6″ three 34-3/4” pieces for the face, back and rails two 10’ pieces for the ends.

4. Using a jigsaw set a 45 degree angle bevel cut one of the 34 ¾ pieces into one 2-1/4 top mounting rail one 3-1/4 bottom mounting rail.

5. Slightly round the front edges of each end and cut the curved detail if desired into the bottom of the face board using a jigsaw.

6. Using three No. 6 x 2-1/2″ galvanized screws at each end, attach both ends of the box to the front face. Countersink each screw head slightly. Assemble all the pieces on a flat surface to make sure the board edges align.

7. Using no.6 x 1-1/2 galvanized screws, secure the top mounting rail to the back piece, flush to the top edge.

8. Inside both end pieces mount the back assembly flush to the top with the rail to the outside of the box. Use no.6 x 2-1/2 galvanized screws. Countersink each screw head slightly.

9. Putty over the screw heads and sand the box. If you plan to paint apply coat of primer then a top coat of an exterior enamel.

10. Drill three ½’ holes in the tray bottom with a layer of coarse gravel or small loose rock then fill with potting soil and plant your flowers.

11. Using four no.6 x 3’ galvanizing screws attach the bottom mounting rail to the wall location. Drop the top rail piece onto the bottom rail piece to mount the box on the wall.

Using this rail set up you can instantly remove the box for transplanting plants or for storing at the end of the growing season.

Windsor-Planter-Box-Explode

Bathroom Vanity by Al – 2014 My Windsor Project Contest Entry

medCabClosed3420smThe follow pictures and edited description was submitted by Al from North Vancouver, BC:
I’d like to thank George at the Windsor Plywood North Vancouver store for cutting all that Maple and Birch for me, for my medicine cabinet in December.

I finally finished it last weekend. The weather was horrible for drying of stain and lacquer. We bought a framed mirror and medicine cabinet from restoration hardware, as the last items for our bathroom reno. As the last items, the size was limited and also the colour had to match. Both items arrived damaged and we sent both back. The second set, the cracked mirror was now replaced and we hung that. However the medicine cabinet had the same problem, all 3 hinges had pulled out.

I will refer to the ‘box’ and the ‘door’. The box is the main rectangular area where items are placed, and the door is a frame that has a mirror in it that pivots off the door.

Problems with the cabinet:
• The box was made of particle board – so it wouldn’t hold a screw.
• The outside measurement of the frame was 1″ larger than the outside measurement of the box – the door had a slight overhang all the way around, so it is not flush and you can’t see the box.
• The cabinet weighs 65 pounds has a mirror on the back of the inside of the box and the door has a mirror on both sides (heavy).
• The cabinet is shipped on the bottom side, and the door is attached. This means that all 65 pounds are put on the bottom of the door, this pushes up on the hinges as all 65 pounds are on the door, plus the shipping box was badly damaged.

This product was doomed.

We kept the mirror, returned the cabinet again, and I embarked on my first cabinet and went to your shop in North Vancouver, BC.

After figuring out what I was going to do and some rushed measurements, I wanted to start asap so the new bathroom wasn’t going to look unfinished for too long. I bought a Kreg Jig to make the box and was looking for some advice while buying wood.

George recommended Maple for strength and Birch for the larger pieces as they stain in a similar way.

I measured as best I could and George made all my cuts for me around Dec 27th, which was great.

It is raining and I don’t have a workshop, I have a small table I setup in the alley and a 7″ tile saw that I have squeezed a 7.25″ wood blade into.

The measurements and cuts were pretty much spot on. Except for a couple of my blunders.

I wanted about 5″ of space so we used 1″ x 6″ Maple for the box which was put together with pocket screws and sanded prior to assembly. The wood was slightly warped, so getting that last screw in proved difficult.

I then attached the .5″ plywood into the back after sanding. I put some holes in the side panels for shelves, put some pocket hole filler notches to cover the holes, they were also Maple.

I then put the shelves on, and they were totally short by about 2″. This was an afterthought and the last cut we made. I probably missed the thickness of the box or something, there was some spare plywood left and I hadn’t thought well enough about their size, so the measurements I gave George were incorrect, I did think of them on the spot.

I did have some plywood left and cut it to size. However I ripped up the wood with my saw blade, mainly because it had too few teeth.

Making the door was difficult. The hinges I bought required to overlap on the frame, so I had to trim bait off the size of the frame, but it went together well, only one broken screw on the Maple. I also got the exact size based on a mirror i bought. I cut the mirror and got 90% of it done when it split twice; I and to buy another one and had adjusted my door size prior to assembly.

Not having a router I had a small router bit on my rotary tool, which was not easy, but it worked.

I started staining the back and oiling it to test it out. Then I did several coats of stain and danish oil. Then I covered the stain with lacquer and oil with tong oil. Both were wet sanded by hand. Oh, and all screws were turned by hand to get a feel for the screws to not break them. The only 600 grain I could find was a metal sandpaper and when it got wet the green paper backing was leaving a green smear, so I had to get different paper. Eventually it worked but I did have some scars on the wood I didn’t notice until later when I had set the box down in the alley on some rocks. I did remove all glue on the frame so it stained nicely but the scaring was invisible to me until lacquering… oh well!

I came back for some Maple veneer which I applied to the shelves and two end cuts. I had some 1″ x 2″ Maple pieces I also bought as a shelf support, which will be used by the hanger to screw into for better strength. More broken screws… had me figure out the pilot holes in Maple had to be bigger and I also dipped the middle part of the screw in water and dishwasher soap (but not the top as that was going into plywood.)

Due to the reduced size of the frame because of the hinges, I now had to trim the 1/8″ plywood that was to be the back of the door, I needed to take an inch off. The experience with ripping the shelves caused me some stress. I found a 150 tooth saw blade on sale, I scored both sides with a strong knife and I covered both sides with masking tape and redrew the line on both sides. I put it through my little saw slowly and it didn’t split any ends at all, whew!

I wanted to use nice gold brass screws to attach the backing to match the colour. Used some #8 and #6s (size). I broke 3.

I managed to use the frame trim to put on the back at the bottom to ensure the box hangs level as the French cleat hanger in the back pushed the top of the box outward and I didn’t think my wife would appreciate a 2.5 month long box build to dump all of her makeup into the toilet. :)

Anyway the thing is done and I am quite happy with the results. I had a bit of stain overlap, the hinges aren’t mounted perfectly, but work well, there are no fancy wood joints, just well hidden pocket screws, and the thing has a mirror, only weighs 45 pounds and obviously didn’t have to ship it. I got a good grain showing on the inside that was not dark… I didn’t want the wood hidden. I have a correct blade now and understand fragility of top layers of plywood, and have a better appreciation for good clamps. The one thing that really bugged me was I stained the inside of the door so that the mirror would not reflect anything on the edges, but the $8.00 glue purchased from a big box store wasn’t transparent and it showed the white grrrrr! So there is some reflection.

I think I need to go with an even thicker brass screw next time. I had #9, #10, #11 and #12, but they were steel intended for the hanger on the back and were also too long to use on the door. 1.25″, door is .75″ + 1/8″.

Thanks to George for helping me with the proper wood, sizing, cutting, great measurement and advice on wood and staining. And for all that cutting he did, as I don’t have a chop saw and the table is pretty small for plywood. It was my 3rd wood object, my first cabinet with complicated measurements (a lot of little details), so thank you.

I have attached some pictures you can use if you like it. My labour on it was pretty long, I think the cost was a little more than the one we purchased…. the wood was 1/2 but the metal pieces screws and all the various stains and oils in their weird quantities that I had to use put it over the one we had purchased but it is a better size.

The next one will probably be an open long shelf, as the measurements are very unique. No door this time!

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Feedback from a Windsor Plywood Customer

November 11 – email received by Windsor Plywood Coquitlam (after deadline for the My Windsor Project Contest)

Subject: Thanks for you!

We wanted to let you know how happy we are with our gorgeous, textured fiberglass door! It has exceeded our expectations!! We’ve taken many photographs, from all angles and different lighting too! It is a true showpiece. Thank you Dave, at Windsor Plywood, Richard, at Richwood Interiors Ltd. and Atilla, at L&A Woodwork Design!! Everyone has been so professional and very helpful in this process. We spent a good sum of money but it was worth every penny!! Unbelievable workmanship from beginning to end!
Sincerely, Glenda and Denis S.
Denis and Glenda Serena Coquitlam

Just Announced! Deck Winner of My Windsor Project Contest

Congratulations to: 
Kirby of Grande Prairie, AB 

Kirby is the designer and builder of a massive 16′ x 34′ deck. That’s 544 square feet of deck!
Below for Kirby’s description of this project;
We purchased Azek decking in two contrasting colours, and used the darker colour to provide the picture frame for the outer two rows of decking, and the lighter colour for the main decking. We are extremely impressed by the product…very resilient to pets, as well as sun fade. 

Part of the structure of the deck is supported by (4) 6″ x 6″ Cedar posts 16 feet long, these posts extend through the decking providing the support for the south end of the two tiered pergola. The pergola is constructed using 2″ x 8″ Cedar boards, and all the connections are notched to provide better support. The north end of pergola was anchored to the house using extension brackets and cedar boards.
We wanted to have an unobstructed view to the yard from inside the house, so we designed a glass rail system and 4″ x 4″ Cedar posts. The glass and posts are at a height of 60″ on sides and 40″ on front. The cedar posts were routered to fit the glass and than anchored to the deck framing.

The products supplied from Windsor Plywood were of top notch quality, and the in store service was friendly, and extremely helpful.

The products were purchased from Windsor Plywood in Grande Prairie, Alberta.
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before pic of deck project
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during reno 1
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Just Announced! Moulding Winner of My Windsor Project Contest

Congratulations to:
Louwren from Grande Prairie, AB

My wife and I were not able to find an adequate entertainment centre to organize our TV, audio/video components, movies and games so I decided to try my hand at building a custom piece.  My previous experience with woodworking/construction was building a fence and framing the basement in a previous house we owned; items that didn’t require a lot of finesse in the build.  This was my first attempt at constructing a piece that needed to look nice!  After spending numerous hours viewing YouTube videos and creating a plan for the entertainment centre I started the build.

As you can see from the photos, the new entertainment centre is a built-in located in our family room and replaces our old Ikea TV stand, and provides additional storage and display space.  The new entertainment centre uses the following materials from Windsor Plywood in Grande Prairie:

· Birch ¾ Plywood – used to create the carcass of the cabinets and shelves

· Birch ½ plywood – used to build the drawers

· Maple boards – used to create the face frames and the storage doors frames

·  Beaded Wainscott – used for the background on the left and right shelving units, and the front of the storage doors

· Crown Molding – used along the top of the entertainment centre

·  Hinges – for the storage doors

· Money spent on these materials was $1,489.29

The entertainment centre was primed and painted with white melamine paint; the baseboard from the wall was used to wrap around the base of the entertainment centre.  Another feature of the entertainment centre is that I installed ABS piping under the left and right shelving units which opens up to the bottom shelve on the centre piece.  This allows speaker wire and the internet cable to be installed easily and makes wires readily available to the audio/video components without having to drill holes in the sides of centre (except for the outer sides of the unit).

Considering this was my first project of this type and scope it turned out very well.  Even my wife would agree J
Mouldings-Winner-after-shot


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Louwrens-During-shot

Winners-with-Darlene-of-GP-Photo-800Store employee Darlene, gives the prize to Louwrens and his son Tayben. Great job!

Just Announced! Door Category Winner from My Windsor Project Contest

Congratulations to:
Margie and Bob from Langley, BC

Pictures attached are of a front door renovation completed during the summer of 2014.
The door, door moulding, door hardware, railings and decking/steps material (Pedra hardwood) were all purchased from Windsor Plywood, Langley.  This DIY renovation was completed by the owners and they love the final results.

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Old front door

BEFORE front door

#beforeafter #picoftheday

Just Announced! Woodworking Winner of the My Windsor Project Contest

Congratulations to:
Dennis of Armstrong, BC 

This highly detailed wooden bowl was turned by Dennis, a customer of Windsor Plywood Vernon store. The bowl is 14″ tall with main body made from Aspen with a ring of Blue Alowood. Inlay on the neck is Bubinga, Purpleheart and Blue Alowood.

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Dennis resides with his family in the beautiful Okanagan Valley in the interior of British Columbia. Shortly after retiring from a career as a Boilermaker Superintendent, Dennis decided to more actively pursue one of his many artistic hobbies, woodworking.  Soon afterwards, a neighbour introduced him to the art of turning bowls on a wood lathe.  Well a passion soon arose.  From simple solid piece bowls Dennis quickly moved on to designing more complex segmented bowls that allowed more of his artistic side to come through.

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Dennis Hassen 006
Each and every bowl is a one-of-a-kind original creation.  Using a variety of the abundant local woods and some exotic woods blended together Dennis creates bowls with unique forms and colour matches.

Dennis Hassen 008When an interesting piece of wood presents itself, Dennis also turns solid piece bowls, trying best to exploit the natural grain and colour of the wood into an eye pleasing shape.

Once again, congratulations to Dennis and his fantastic project!

#beforeafter #picoftheday

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