Category Archives: Customer Projects

Graham Kitchen Project

Maple cabinets in kitchenThe Windsor Plywood store in Coquitlam shared these pictures of a customer kitchen project.

All the wood in the kitchen was purchased from the local store and built by a customer. The wood used was domestic maple plywood and solid, surfaced four sides (s4s) maple stock.

The results are amazing!

maple-kitchen-cabinets maple-kitchen-cabinets maple-pantry-doors Maple kitchen cabinets Maple cabinets in kitchen

 

 

Fir Conference Table Project by Windsor Plywood Cranbrook – Part 1

Canfor_Conference_Table-ProjectSteve from the Cranbrook store sent in another project. His crew and himself are working on a 6′ wide by 24′ long conference table for a customer. The top and trestle style of legs will be made from locally harvested Douglas Fir. The customer supplied a bit over 500 board feet of lumber. In the next few weeks, Steve will share more pictures as the project progresses.

 

 

 

Kyra’s Mahogany Bookshelf Project

The following story was shared from Kyra in Calgary, Alberta.

Built by the In-house carpenter at the Windsor Plywood Calgary south location to match the antique mahogany desk I refinished. The bookshelf is perfect and I was able to stain and lacquer it to match perfectly. It is a shame to put books on it as it is so beautiful!

Thank you Windsor Plywood! I’ll be back!!! So nice to get custom work done in exotic wood!!!Better than anything you can buy at a furniture store!!!! Thanks, Mahogany-bookshelf

Kens Live edge Black Walnut Coffee and End Table Project

The following story and pictures were sent in from Ken from Lake Country, BC. Ken is a frequent visitor to the Windsor Plywood in Vernon.

“I have been doing various wood projects for the past 10 years. Mainly for my family, such as self designed cradles and sit on toy boxes.

This summer, I got a chance to buy (7) Black Walnut slabs from a local mill in Summerland, BC. 

From these, I built the live edge coffee table and end table.  It is the first time that I have worked with this type of rough slabs and took a bit of time to match up the slabs for the table tops and legs.  I used my camera and took pictures of each slab and then printed them out.  By cutting the slabs out of the paper and matching, it was a good method to develop the tables. 

The slabs were narrow enough, that it was possible to use a power planner to smooth out the mill saw teeth marks on both sides of the slabs.  From there, use a band saw to cut to length of the table tops.  Removed the bark using a right angled grinder with a concrete grinding disk and to shape the live edge curves that I wanted in the tables.  Then used the small handheld belt sander and orbital sander to finish the shapes and table tops.  Sanding down to 220 grit and using a light and magnifying glass to check for sanding marks.

The legs took some time to design, cut out and finish, using the same tools.  Then the tables were sealed with wood conditioner and have 4 coats of gloss Polyurethane.  It was hard work to not get runs, so had to sand some of those out with each coat. 

I had started to build these for my wife, but there has been interest in purchasing them from a couple people, so if the price is right, I may sale them and then build another set for my wife.

The project was fun and being the first time working with this type of wood, there was a lot of time spent looking at the slabs and then slowly cutting them out and designing how to put them together, overall hours were in the 80 hours per table.

The walnut candle holders were from scrap and for our RV Trailer.”

Thank you Ken for sharing this project with your fellow woodworkers.

Black Walnut slabs after planningCoffee Table end view Righ side live edge walnut coffee table finished Side view of coffee table the two finished Coffee and End TablesCandle holders from Walnut for RV

Windsor Plywood Donates Materials to UBC SailBot Project

Every year more than 60 students from the University of British Columbia come together to design and build a fully autonomous sailboat, a Sailbot.

This summer, a team of engineering students from the University of British Columbia is hoping its 5.5-metre-long boat will sail into the history books as the first seafaring vessel to successfully traverse the Atlantic entirely solo.

UBC’s sailbot plans to launch in August and sail 2,900 km, three-week journey across the Atlantic Ocean all on its own to Dingle, Ireland.

Windsor Plywood wanted to be part of this impressive achievement and donated materials to the project.
From the Team Captain, Serena “I have fond memories of working with the MDF, stringers and plywood you sent to us in 2014! I was on the Mechanical Team at the time and it was my first time ever using power tools in the early days when I drilled, sawed and shaped your wood under the guidance of Dave Tiessen, who was the Mechanical Team Lead at the time. I think many members go through tremendous growth in their time on the team, and thank you for giving us the resources to do this.”

If you would like to follow Ada’s progress as she goes across Canada and then across the Atlantic Ocean, you can do so at the blog: https://ubcsailbot.org/blog/

More pictures: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ubcsailbot/
Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/ubcsailbots
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ubcsailbot/

2016 7 16 UBC Sailbot Sponsorship Appreciation Night_Clare_Kiernan 211
Strong back-jan2014Frames and Stringers-March2014Cedar_Strips-May2014Carbon Fibre Prep-Sept2014First_Layers of Carbon FibreKeel -July2015Construction_of_rudder-July2015Wiring_and_pre_for_Painting-March2015Keel_and_Rudder_Prep-March2015Ada_UBC_Sailbot_Trials1Ada_Sailbot_TrialsAda_UBC_SailBot_Team

Rustic Coat Rack

The following picture was shared from the Johner’s Windsor Plywood Facebook page

A rustic birch coat hanger! Finished with the Masterline Polyurethane Satin finish!
Rustic Coat Hanger

Custom Cabinets by Sweet Relief Pastries

The following pictures were sent in the from the Windsor Plywood Calgary North store. Big thanks to the store owner, Deidre, for sending us more information about the project. (We were all quite speechless from staring at the desserts.) Check out the Calgary-based bakery website at www.sweetreliefpastries.com or the Facebook page.

We decided to go with shaker style cabinetry to keep things clean and modern but still beautiful to look at…we didn’t want it to look like regular cabinetry! The simple moulding around the edges helps to keep things warm and inviting, while not being too decorative that it takes away from our cakes and pastries. This was our first project, and through the skillful instruction and help of our friend and cabinetmaker Andy Vorra we were able to construct our very own custom cabinetry! 

Sweet-Relief--Veneer-lights-cabinetsSweet-Relief-veneer-lights-close-up Sweet-Relief-store-inside-800Sweet-Relief-Close-up-of-pastriesSweet-Relief-owners-infront-cabinetsSweet-Relief-owners

Chess Inspired Coat Rack

The following customer project was shared by the Windsor Plywood Calgary North store.

“One of our regular contractors happens to be an excellent craftsman as well.  He made this coat rack from sapele, cherry, and maple.  He turned everything himself, including the top piece that is based off a chess piece.”

Chesse-Piece-Coat-Stand

Big Parota Dinner Table Project by Boris

The following story and pictures were submitted by Ed at the Windsor Plywood Winnipeg. It was started with pictures shared from a loyal customer, Boris. t (Thank you Boris! For going the extra mile, we see your hard work in your words and pictures.)

I am sending you a number of pictures that show not just the final product but some of the process steps, too.

I have worked on a number of projects, but this one was fairly large and in some ways new to me. It all started when I came to Windsor Plywood to buy paint as my wife and I started to redecorate the house. We knew we needed a new dining table and were already considering making it out of a live edge slab. There was no plan made, but then I walked into the store and immediately saw this gorgeous slab. The wood looked warm and beautiful, with a striking edge, and the width was perfect. The slab was almost flawless, and after about a week of contemplation, we decided to take the opportunity. It was the quality and the uniqueness of the slab that became the final decision point.

The size of the slab was 3-3/8” x 44” x 16’. I figured I could make a 10’ table top and use the two 3’ ends of the slab for the legs. I am an engineer and I like to first make a design of my woodworking project using DraftSight software. The project got me so excited I would sometimes wake up at night and start thinking of and coming up with good ideas and solutions.

The slab was delivered to my house at the end of January, and it took me about two months working after work and on the weekends to have it finished. One thing I have learned is, making something the first time never gives the best result. So I had to check everything several times before making each step. And yes, I know I could do some things better yet.

I built a guide jig around the slab and a sleigh for the router. I flattened both sides of the slab which brought it from 3-3/8” to 2-3/4”. I sanded the face side using a rented floor sander. I made a template for the legs by drafting them, then using my scroll saw to cut the template out of 3/8” MDF board. I used a jig saw and a router to finalize the shape of the template.

The table top of this thickness does not require a frame, and each leg can be attached to the top using side blocks on each side of the leg. The support blocks were attached to the legs with good epoxy. Each block had 3 holes for 3/8 x 5” stainless steel lug bolts to hold them to the table top (6 bolts per leg).

After the legs were attached to the table, it was finally ready for finishing. I used 80, 120, 220 and 320 grit sandpapers to prepare it for oiling. I also decided to use pure unmodified tung oil from Lee Valley, to finish the table. Tung oil has several advantages: it does not change the color of the wood, preserving its original color and penetrating deep and bringing up the texture. It protects wood from liquids, juices, and alcohol spills. It does not darken over time. It is food safe. The only problem with tung oil is that you have to have a lot of patience waiting for weeks to add another layer. I am still in the process of doing it.

Parota wood had it surprises! First, it appeared to be very light and easy to machine and sand. Second, it is the most irritating wood there is, with an effect of a pepper spray! On the scale of irritability, I would give it 10 out of 10. Nothing can be done with it without a good dust mask.

The job is over now and it brings us a great deal of satisfaction. My wife and I like to arrange dinners for our family and friends, and we already had a few dinners around the new table. Everybody likes to come join us even more now! Our dining room became a fabulous, warm place.

Thank you for making my project public, I hope it will encourage other folks to go for big projects.

Best regards, 

Boris T.

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