Category Archives: Flooring

Greg’s Cork Flooring Project – Employee Project

Windsor Plywood’s Advertising Manager, Greg, sent in photos and comments about the 11MM Bevel Cork flooring he installed at home:

“We’ve been in our house for just over a year and had an 11′ x 10′ ground floor room with old carpeting that was not in bad shape but needed to be replaced to make the room more comfortable. The rest of the house is hard maple hardwood and this was the last room with carpet.

Old foam underlay beneath the carpet over concrete but it always felt cold to walk on and being carpet was hard to keep clean.  We decided to replace it with 11mm cork tiles.

Materials and Tools:
8_tools-web

  • 10 boxes of Winchester 11mm prefinished cork tile flooring from Windsor Plywood
  • 2 rolls of Quietwalk underlay (perfect for over concrete with it’s built-in vapour barrier)
  • Table saw is ideal or a Rockwell BladeRunner Tabletop Saw.
  • Safety mask or goggles
  • Dust mask and gloves (for the carpet removal)
  • Hammer and pry bar
  • Rubber mallet
  • Utility knife and a good pair of scissors (for cutting the underlay)
  • Pencil
  • Tape measure
  • Ruler or T-Square
  • Hygrometer
  • Gorilla Tape or Tuck tape
  • Flooring install kit with spacers, tapping block and pull bar
  • A box of finishing nails and construction adhesive (for reinstalling existing baseboards that need moving)
  • Baseboard chalking
  • Wood T-moulding for under the door

5_hygrometer-webPrep: Used a hygrometer to measure the room temperature and the relative humidity levels. I normally keep our hygrometer upstairs where we have solid hard maple hardwood flooring throughout our main level, stairs and upstairs bedrooms. For cork flooring, the room should be between 17-23 degrees Celsius with a relative humidity of 45 – 60 percent. The room is on the front of the house, always in shade and even on the hottest summer day the room only gets up to 23 degrees Celsius with the windows closed and A/C off.

2_before_carpet-webPulled up the old carpet and underlay. Carefully pulled up all of the old carpet tack strips around the perimeter of the room (strips of wood with small nails through it to keep the carpet in place), then scrapped away any residue and adhesive from the old underlay.

4_rusty_carpet_strips-web

Checked the bare concrete for moisture problems, holes or cracks and evenness. I was able to leave half of the existing baseboard mouldings in place as the cork tiles with the underlay fit under it nicely. For tight areas like the closet and the final row up against the wall with the hallway door,  I removed the baseboards to make it easier to click together and drop in the last row of tiles.  A small crowbar made removing the baseboards very easy.  Pulled out any bent nails in the baseboards through the back side of the mouldings to keep the face side clean for reinstallation later.

3_concrete-web

The cork is a floating floor so no nailing or gluing required. Unrolled the Quietwalk underlay with the vapour barrier side up and butt taped the lengths together with gorilla tape.  I found that the best way to cut the Quietwalk underlay is with a good pair of scissors.  I tested making cuts with utility knives, shears and several pairs of scissors but found a heavy duty kitchen pair that cut it very cleanly and easily.

6_install-web
I loosely put down the first roll of tiles along the length of the back wall (which is the longest length of the room) and cut off the tongue along the edge that faced the wall so the tiles fit in well under the baseboards.  Also used spacers, so the flooring was not fully against the walls to give room for expansion (required for all wood flooring … though cork is actually the bark of the tree).  Used a BladeRunner X2 portable table saw to make my cuts.

rockwell-bladerunnerA traditional handsaw would have worked fine but the Rockwell Bladerunner (it’s like an upside down jigsaw built into a table) made it very quick, easy and clean (especially with the built-in vacuum hose attachment). Also much quieter for indoor use than a full table saw with a rotating blade and the whole unit is only 15 pounds! Note that the photo does not show the jigsaw blade for safety reasons (quickly and easily pops out when not is use). A great tool for DIYers and quick little jobs. I’ve used it to cut ceramic tiles, melamine shelving, metal bars (to shorten a safety bar hanger that I installed between attic floor joists for a ceiling fan), rip flat stock moulding and for scroll work. However, for very fine cuts for mouldings or very thick materials you definitely need a circular table saw or a chop saw.  7_cork-web

The cork tiles click together and you use a tap bar and mallet to make sure the joints are tight; then a pull bar for the end pieces when you don’t have room for the tap bar. With all the tiles down, reinstalled the baseboards I pulled out and just need a piece of wood t-moulding under the door to cover the gap between the cork and the hallway floor.

We’ve noticed a big difference with the cork flooring. It absorbs sound and insulates so the floor is never cold, even in bare feet on a cold day. The Quietwalk underlay gives the flooring an R value. It’s also anti-allergenic, anti-static (no more zaps when walking around in socks!) and is very easy to clean. Prefinished with 3 layers of polyurethane for durability and very comfortable to walk on, not hard like ceramic tile or laminate floorings. No more carpet!

Greg, Langley, BC

Bedroom Project by Amanda- My Windsor Project Contest Entry

We just bought our house two years ago and with it came a beautiful sea of blue carpet. This was the first time I’ve ever installed laminate flooring!

We loved the product (Taiga Synergy Envy) because of the colour, beveled edges, easy install and warranty.

Before

Before

During

During

After

After

Window Sills Project by Gerry – My Windsor Project Contest Entry

Last year I removed my old water damaged window sills and replaced them with new oak window sills along with oak crown mouldings placed underneath. I purchased from the Chilliwack Windsor Plywood center the needed 3/4 inch oak boards along with the oak crown mouldings and being a do it your-selfer I managed to cut out very carefully the old MDF sills using of all things a drill and then very carefully by hand chiselling out the MDF. It was a laborious process but wanting to be careful to not damage the windows or the window plate I managed to remove it all and installed the new and they look great.

Next to installing new window sills using Windsor Plywood products I also used their stain in Summer Oak which was suggested to me by the sales person and the reason I wanted to go with this particular stain is because of the kitchen which i wanted to match with the pre-existing cabinets and do they ever. Happy as can be and also the oak sills were coating to with Windsor Plywoods Varathane Diamond clear semi-gloss and the results well they speak for themselves. (the only problem, I don’t have the before pictures to show you.)

IMG_0521

IMG_0520 IMG_0519 IMG_0199 IMG_0527 IMG_0526

Along with doing my window sills I also used Windsor Plywood for buying flooring for my kitchen and bathroom and I used Coastal Spice Scraped Vinyl Flooring and it looks great (First picture below).

IMG_0522 IMG_0523 IMG_0528 IMG_0529

Hobbit House by Arnie – My Windsor Project Contest Entry

My husband spent his summer building this hobbit house for our son. I was afraid at first as it started to take over our backyard, I thought he was in over his head…but he build this beautiful structure that my son and his friends love to play in. We have had many visits from all our neighbours wondering why there is grass hanging over the top of our fence and why there is a chimney stack sticking up from the mound of grass! We have even been told our neighbours have seen people hanging over the fence trying to take pictures of our hobbit house! Hope you enjoy 🙂

DSC_0838 DSC_0840 DSC_0843 DSC_0849 IMG_5688

Kitchen Renovation by Alvin – My Windsor Project Contest Entry

Kitchen Renovation: re-surface some existing cabinets and built some new ones to change the kitchen configuration.  Cabinets and crown moulding done in Cherry.  Added soft close hinges to upper cabinets.  New glass backslash, new granite countertops, new lighting and new flooring throughout.

Before: Light Oak Cabinets


IMG_0322 IMG_0324 IMG_0323

After: Medium Cherry Cabinets
IMG_0058 IMG_0057 IMG_0056 IMG_0055 IMG_0053

Staircase Upgrade (Entry to the Great Canadian Contest 2008)

My name is Mike and have been undergoing a reno of 1400 square feet of the upstairs of my house for the last eight months.  I have done all the work myself except the installation of gas fireplaces.  The photo I am submitting is not necessarily a ‘room’ renovation but a huge part of the house in itself.  It’s the staircase.

The reason I chose this to submit rather than a room was because of the expertise help I received to get the job done.  The staff at the Coquitlam Windsor Plywood are all top notch!  It’s great knowing you can go into there with questions that will get answered by people who know their stuff.  Unlike other stores, the information I get from Windsor is the correct info.  Your staff answered all my questions, gave me tips and were very friendly doing so.

The material I used in this particular project from Windsor was the MDF skirting and baseboards.  Hope you like!

house renos 069
house renos 008
house renos 042
house renos 044

Laundry Room Makeover

4This project was submitted by Angelo to the 2008 Great Canadian Contest
Well, it was time for the old laundry room to make way for a whole new look.

Thanks to the wide choice of Windsor plywoods, veneers and mouldings (not to mention some nifty tiling work), I was able to transform my laundry room into something worth getting dirty for!

Using plywood and 2×4 I raised the floor about 4.5″ to create a custom-built pedestal for the washer/dryer. I then decided to add some more countertop workspace by again framing with 2×4 and plywood for a custom-built tumbled marble countertop.

The floor was tiled with granite and natural stone and a mosaic was framed in the center by the stone. The walls were troweled on and hand-polished with a “Venetian Plaster” (shiny marble-looking plaster) then stenciled with a leaf pattern in gold paint.

Wood veneers and mouldings were added to the cabinetry and door to add even more decorative elements. There’s also a pull-out ironing board center (not shown in photos) which was veneered/stained to match cabinetry.

Don’t forget to enter the My Windsor Project Contest. Entries must be received by email or mail by September 30th, 2014. Click here for more information.

2

Before

11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3

Throwback Thursday- Page 1 of 1954 Catalogue

1954_catalog_page2Page 1 of “The Windsor” Catalogue from 1954

(Note: these prices are not in effect. A few samples below) #throwbackthursday

DOORS- BROOKES PLYADOOR

2’0″ x 6’6″ x 1-3/8″…. FIR- Paint Grade $8.20  FIR- “C” Grade…. $6.00  MAHOGANY- $9.50
2’4″ x 6’6″ x 1-3/8″…. FIR- Paint Grade $8.50  FIR- “C” Grade…. $6.75  MAHOGANY- $9.80
2’6″ x 6’6″ x 1-3/8″…. FIR- Paint Grade $8.80  FIR- “C” Grade…. $7.25  MAHOGANY- $10.15
2’8″ x 6’8″ x 1-3/8″…. FIR- Paint Grade $9.20  FIR- “C” Grade…. $7.50  MAHOGANY- $10.50
* “C” Grade slab doors have repairable surface defects

KILN-DRIED FLOORING

FIR FLOORING

Kiln-dried fir flooring in “C and Better” grade. Sizes 1″ x 3″ and 1″ x 4″. Fir-Flooring-end-grainWhen ordering be sure to specify whether flat grain or edge grain required.
Flat Grain…. per board foot $.17 1/2
Edge Grain…. per board foot $.21 1/2

OAK FLOORING

A beautiful flooring with hard-wearing qualities that resist marking. A floor that lats a lifetime. Each piece is tongue and groove and end-matched and is very easy to lay. All our oak flooring is bundled in small convenient bundles which makes it easy to handle.

No. 1 COMMON REGULAR LENGTHS (2′ lengths and up)
25/32″ x 2-1/4″…. per Board Foot $.28 ….  Approx. Price Per Sq. Ft. Laid Measure $.38
1/2″ x 2″…. per Board Foot $.27 ….  Approx. Price Per Sq. Ft. Laid Measure $.38

No. 2 COMMON REGULAR LENGTHS (2′ lengths and up)
1/2″ x 2″…. per Board Foot $.16 ….  Approx. Price Per Sq. Ft. Laid Measure $.22 1/2

No. 2 COMMON SHORTS (average length 1 1/4″)
25/32″ x 2-1/4″…. per Board Foot $.17 ….  Approx. Price Per Sq. Ft. Laid Measure $.23
1/2″ x 2″…. per Board Foot $.12 ….  Approx. Price Per Sq. Ft. Laid Measure $.16 1/2
COMPARE these prices to the cost of inlaid linoleum!

Giant Hardwood Trees Brought Up from the Bottom of the Panama Canal (See Video)

In 1913, while building the Panama Canal, Theodore Roosevelt created what was then the world’s largest man-made lake (Gutan Lake) by damming the Chagres River and flooding an old growth jungle the size of Montreal. Ninety-seven years later, using submersible hydraulic chain saws lubricated with vegetable oil, these perfectly preserved tropical hardwood trees are being harvested from that underwater jungle.

Canal_Zapatero_screenThe Species: Canal Zapatero (Hieronima alchorneoides)

Appearance: Heartwood is dark reddish brown. Sapwood is mild reddish brown. Medium but pronounced grain pattern, usually straight or interlocked. Moderate lustre. Overall rich and warm. Very consistent color and grain.

Species Characteristics: Very hard and durable. Naturally resistant to decay, funguses and termite attack. Odourless and tasteless.

Uses: High quality furniture, veneers, wall panelling and general carpentry and millwork. Well suited for indoor and outdoor use. Very hard and very suitable for solid or engineered flooring or decking.

Work Properties: Canal Zapatero is easy to saw and work with hand tools, good to moderately good to plane, excellent for turning, mortising, boring, moulding and sanding. Nailing is difficulty and pre drilling is recommended. It finishes very well. Two or three coats of sealer are recommended. Because of the woods natural beauty it is recommended to use a transparent finish.

Hardness: Janka hardness – 1700. Excellent in high traffic areas.

Go to www.windsorplywood.com and find a location nearest to you.

Canal_Zapetero-inspection_by_customer800

Natural Acacia Engineered Flooring

Acacia_Natural_Engineered
  • Engineered Hardwood Flooring
  • Handscraped
  • Float-in installation
  • Prefinished no wax surface with stain guard UV protection
  • 25 Year manufacturer warranty

Description

One of the easiest floors to install on the market today. Specifically designed to be installed easily over most existing floors in just hours. Does not require nailing or gluing down, the simple float-in installation allows the average homeowner to do it themselves. Easy to maintain, just give it a vacuum or dust mop… what could be easier! Stain Guard UV protection. No wax surface protects the natural beauty of the wood. Resists stains, spills and dirt.

 

Scroll to top