Category Archives: Table Tops

Maple Table Top with Cherry Inlays

The Windsor Plywood Cranbrook store was working on another project in the wood shop. This time it maple plank table with cherry inlays. The table is 38″ wide by 96″ long. It’s crafted from 2″ thick by 4″ to 6″ wide planks of maple.
What a fantastic project to take on!

Some of the tools used:
Festool OF 1010 EQ Plunge Router
Festool Guide Rail FS FS 2700/2
Festool Multi-Mode Sander RO 150 FEQ-Plus
Big thanks to the team for stopping and taking pictures of the process.
Look forwards to more projects in the future.

Folded Berlinia Table by Gellhaus Woodworks

The ever talented Gellhaus Woodworks bought a beauty piece of Berlinia from Windsor Plywood Sherwood Park and wrapped it with a Wenge edge. Below was the picture gallery and information from the owner, Bart. For more fantastic pictures of furniture, be sure to check out Gellhaus Woodworks, the Instagram #gellhauswoodworks and Facebook page.

“The Folded Berlinia Table is made from solid Berlinia and trimmed with Wenge. This piece has a wealth of complex lines and angles. It provides a ton of interesting negative space and was intended to look like a single piece of wood that has been “simply” folded into shape. The two pieces of Berlinia that I used had nice bright sapwood on one side, so I joined the pieces with the sapwood in the middle to create a stripe that the viewer can follow around and throughout the whole piece. The tables measures:42″ x 22″ x 15 1/2″.
This piece is currently for sale in the “For Immediate Sale” area of the website. It has been signed and numbered personally by me.”

Windsor Plywood Gingerbread House Wins Contest and Donates Funds Back to Charity

img_0110Windsor Plywood Cranbrook has claimed first prize in the Gingerbread House contest for the local Boys and Girls Club.

Owner Steve has donated the entire $500 prize back to the Boys and Girls Club charity.

An additional $140 was also raised at an auction for the actual gingerbread house. It measures 3 feet by 4 feet and is made from 3 gallons of icing, Baltic Birch plywood framing, gingerbread logs, real rocks, plenty of candy and required 10 hours of work.

It was a great chance to give back to the community and put some smiles on kids’ faces.

Windsor Plywood plans on being a sponsor at next year’s event and will also provide small gingerbread houses for children to assemble.

The contest garnered 30 entries, 40 gift baskets and 12 decorated trees which were sold at auction and silent bids. Over $7000 was raised and lots of fun was had!
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Rustic Barn Door Table Project

Custom bar wood vanity made out of Zator's barn door fir ,finished off with vinager and steel wool mix ,320 dollars cost ,2100 sell 6 hours of workThe crew at the Windsor Plywood Cranbrook store were it again. This time it was repurposing a rustic barn and using all the parts to make a table. Additional pieces of wood were cut for the legs and cross supports. The next step was to “age” the surface of the wood with the combination of vinegar, steel wool and tea. Click here to learn more about this process.
The table measures 52 inches long, 42 inches wide by 39 inches tall.
It took the staff 2 days to complete the project from start to finish. Looks great!
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Fir Conference Table Project by Windsor Plywood Cranbrook – Part 3

fir-table-img_7489The staff at the Cranbrook store have finished the Douglas Fir Conference Table. What a beautiful table! The staff spent just over 22 hours into the creation and the total weight of all the tables is 650 lbs! A big thank you go to the crew for taking pictures of the progress and sharing the project.

Check out the slideshow below for more pictures

Fir Conference Table Project by Windsor Plywood Cranbrook – Part 2

fir-table_pipe_clamps2The staff and Steve at the Windsor Plywood Cranbrook store have been working hard on the conference table. So far, the table top planks have been cut, trimmed, drilled for dominos (a style of dowels for joining wood together), glued and lightly sanded. It’s coming along well. The materials used so far has been:
– 480 dominos in top
– 102 in bases
– A gallon of glue
– new saw blade
– knives for the planer

Check back next week for more progress.

table top glued and ready to assemble

Fir Conference Table Project by Windsor Plywood Cranbrook – Part 1

Canfor_Conference_Table-ProjectSteve from the Cranbrook store sent in another project. His crew and himself are working on a 6′ wide by 24′ long conference table for a customer. The top and trestle style of legs will be made from locally harvested Douglas Fir. The customer supplied a bit over 500 board feet of lumber. In the next few weeks, Steve will share more pictures as the project progresses.

 

 

 

Super Wide Parota Slabs

A few pictures to share of some super wide Natural Live Edge Parota Hardwood. Some of these pieces measure up to 57″ wide by 160″ long. Parota is primarily Central America, as well as Mexico and northern South America. Trees grow from 65 – 100 ft tall and 5 – 8 ft in diameter.
Check out your local Windsor Plywood store for stock and selection.
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Big Parota Dinner Table Project by Boris

The following story and pictures were submitted by Ed at the Windsor Plywood Winnipeg. It was started with pictures shared from a loyal customer, Boris. t (Thank you Boris! For going the extra mile, we see your hard work in your words and pictures.)

I am sending you a number of pictures that show not just the final product but some of the process steps, too.

I have worked on a number of projects, but this one was fairly large and in some ways new to me. It all started when I came to Windsor Plywood to buy paint as my wife and I started to redecorate the house. We knew we needed a new dining table and were already considering making it out of a live edge slab. There was no plan made, but then I walked into the store and immediately saw this gorgeous slab. The wood looked warm and beautiful, with a striking edge, and the width was perfect. The slab was almost flawless, and after about a week of contemplation, we decided to take the opportunity. It was the quality and the uniqueness of the slab that became the final decision point.

The size of the slab was 3-3/8” x 44” x 16’. I figured I could make a 10’ table top and use the two 3’ ends of the slab for the legs. I am an engineer and I like to first make a design of my woodworking project using DraftSight software. The project got me so excited I would sometimes wake up at night and start thinking of and coming up with good ideas and solutions.

The slab was delivered to my house at the end of January, and it took me about two months working after work and on the weekends to have it finished. One thing I have learned is, making something the first time never gives the best result. So I had to check everything several times before making each step. And yes, I know I could do some things better yet.

I built a guide jig around the slab and a sleigh for the router. I flattened both sides of the slab which brought it from 3-3/8” to 2-3/4”. I sanded the face side using a rented floor sander. I made a template for the legs by drafting them, then using my scroll saw to cut the template out of 3/8” MDF board. I used a jig saw and a router to finalize the shape of the template.

The table top of this thickness does not require a frame, and each leg can be attached to the top using side blocks on each side of the leg. The support blocks were attached to the legs with good epoxy. Each block had 3 holes for 3/8 x 5” stainless steel lug bolts to hold them to the table top (6 bolts per leg).

After the legs were attached to the table, it was finally ready for finishing. I used 80, 120, 220 and 320 grit sandpapers to prepare it for oiling. I also decided to use pure unmodified tung oil from Lee Valley, to finish the table. Tung oil has several advantages: it does not change the color of the wood, preserving its original color and penetrating deep and bringing up the texture. It protects wood from liquids, juices, and alcohol spills. It does not darken over time. It is food safe. The only problem with tung oil is that you have to have a lot of patience waiting for weeks to add another layer. I am still in the process of doing it.

Parota wood had it surprises! First, it appeared to be very light and easy to machine and sand. Second, it is the most irritating wood there is, with an effect of a pepper spray! On the scale of irritability, I would give it 10 out of 10. Nothing can be done with it without a good dust mask.

The job is over now and it brings us a great deal of satisfaction. My wife and I like to arrange dinners for our family and friends, and we already had a few dinners around the new table. Everybody likes to come join us even more now! Our dining room became a fabulous, warm place.

Thank you for making my project public, I hope it will encourage other folks to go for big projects.

Best regards, 

Boris T.

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