Tag Archives: old

Big Addition to a Small Cabin by George – My Windsor Project Contest Entry

As we are now living in our cabin as a year round home our plan was to make the kitchen bigger and make room for a proper water filtering system. We started by enclosing our existing 12’ x 14’ covered overhang. We also moved the dining room wall 4’ to the west. This meant rearranging the existing bathroom and by doing so we converted an existing bedroom into an ensuite and mechanical room. WE are only days away from having everything done  (has been a long 4 months). Part of the problem was the original cabin is 50 years old, it has a 30-year-old addition and we are using modern building techniques. The doors are from Windsor Plywood and are made from Brazilian Plantation pine. The cedar beams and all of the pine trim and baseboards are also from Windsor Plywood. We are very pleased with the results and have received a number of compliments.

PICTURES
-152 & 154-exisitng covered deck prior to construction
-173 & 174-covered deck framed in
-193- old living room – 734 & 735 new living room
-194-old bathroom-744 new bathroom
-226-old bathroom from old laundry room-743 new
-242-from proposed new kitchen looking through gutted bedroom that was converted to ensuite and mechanical room-731 & 742 new
-247-dining room wall moved over 4’ -728 new
-248-from proposed kitchen through new dining room and living room-738 new
-250-fom LR through DR and kitchen with old ceiling-728 new
-901-picture of doors before installation
-902-West LR wall-736 new
-730, 731 and 733-new photos

152 154 173 174 193 194 226 242 247 248 250 901 902 IMG_0728 IMG_0731 IMG_0732 IMG_0733 IMG_0734 IMG_0735 IMG_0736 IMG_0738 IMG_0740 IMG_0741 IMG_0742 IMG_0743 IMG_0744

Bill’s Desk Made from Panama Canal Wood- My Windsor Project Contest Entry

This desk was made from Panama Canal hardwoods. It was purchased from Windsor Plywood in Fort St. John.

042

rodgers new building 004

What makes this wood special was it was reclaimed from the Panama Canal. In 1913, while building the Panama Canal, Theodore Roosevelt created what was the world’s largest man-made lake (Gutan Lake) by damming the Chagres River and flooding an old growth jungle the size of Montreal. Ninety-seven years later, using submersible hydraulic chain saws lubricated with vegetable oil, these perfectly preserved tropical hardwood trees are being harvested from that underwater jungle.

See below or click this link for more information.

The Age of the World’s Oldest Timber Constructions is Determined

December 20, 2012 – Story and images sourced from Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

Researchers have determined the age of the world’s oldest timber constructions: the 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig.

Scientists of the University of Freiburg document highly-developed construction techniques of wells built by early neolithic settlers.

A research team led by Willy Tegel and Dr. Dietrich Hakelbergfrom the Institute for Forest Growth of the University of Freiburg has succeeded in precisely dating four water wells built by the first Central European agricultural civilization with the help of dendrochronology or growth ring dating. The wells were excavated at settlements in the Greater Leipzig region and are the oldest known timber constructions in the world. They were built by the Linear Pottery culture, which existed from roughly 5600 to 4900 BC. The team’s findings, which have been published in the international scientific journal PLoS ONE, afford new insight into prehistoric technology. The study was conducted by archaeologists and dendrochronologists from the Institute for Forest Growth in Freiburg, the Archaeological Heritage Office of Saxony in Dresden, and the Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL in Birmensdorf, Switzerland.

Wells constructed from oak wood
The four early Neolithic wells were constructed from oak wood. In addition to the timber, many other waterlogged organic materials, such as plant remains, wooden artifacts, bark vessels, and bast fiber cords, as well as an array of richly decorated ceramic vessels, have survived for millennia hermetically sealed below groundwater level. With the help of dendrochronology, the scientists were able to determine the exact felling years of the trees and thus also the approximate time at which the wells were constructed. The tests revealed that the wood comes from massive old oak trees felled by early Neolithic farmers with stone adzes between the years of 5206 and 5098 BC. The farmers cleaved the trunks into boards, assembling them to make chest-like well linings with complex corner joints. Using state-of-the-art laser scanning technology, the scientists collected data on the timbers and tool marks and documented the highly developed woodworking skills of the early Neolithic settlers. The very well-preserved tool marks and timber joints testify to unexpectedly sophisticated timber construction techniques.

Developed woodworking technology enabled a sedentary lifestyle 

In the course of the sixth millennium BC, the nomadic hunting and gathering lifestyle gave way to a sedentary lifestyle with agriculture and stock breeding in Central Europe. This break in the history of mankind has been termed the “Neolithic Revolution.” A sedentary lifestyle required permanent housing, and houses are inconceivable without a developed woodworking technology – in other words, the first farmers were also the first carpenters. Until now, however, archaeologists have only succeeded in unearthing the soil marks left by their houses. The precisely dated wells will enable scientists to conduct more detailed studies on the important role of timber construction techniques for mankind’s adoption of a sedentary lifestyle.

Portrait

Willy Tegel und Dr. Dietrich Hakelberg

Willy Tegel und Dr. Dietrich Hakelberg are members of the Institute for Forest Growth at the University of Freiburg. Contact via phone: 0761 / 203-8591 or via E-Mail: tegel@dendro.de

Gallery

The well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig

The 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig during the excavation.
The 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig during the excavation. Ceramic finds in the backfill of the well.
Log construction of the 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig during the excavation.
The 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig during the excavation. Laser scanning image of the base frame with mortise and tenon corner joints: A projecting piece of wood is fed through a hole in the plank and secured with a wooden nail. Ceramic finds.
Base frame of the 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig during the excavation.
Laser scanning image of the base frame with the mortise and tenon corner joints of the 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig during the excavation. The corner joints consist of a projecting piece of wood fed through a hole in the plank and secured with a wooden nail.
Mortise and tenon corner joints and wooden nails from the 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig. The corner joints consist of a projecting piece of wood fed through a hole in the plank and secured with a wooden nail.
Scroll to top