Tag Archives: woodworking

Ambrosia Maple Dining Table by Dan – Customer Projects

The following story and pictures were sent in from Dan at Integrity Woodworks. Dan can be reached atthewoodbug@gmail.com for more information. Thank you Dan for sharing and we look forwards to more projects.

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Finally, I am creating a dining set for the love of my life. Maple table top, black walnut bases, and figured black cherry sculpted chairs.

We started with a 12 foot long 13 ish inch wide 3-inch thick book matched set of big leaf maple slabs. bookmatched 12 foot Ambrosia maple slabs
First step was to cut both slabs in half length wise , three pieces becoming the top
anther the bench top

top pieces before removing live edge from center board
Top pieces before removing live edge from center board

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Top in various stages of layout and glue up, with these I flatten with hand planes after glue up is complete and stable.

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After about 40 hours of flattening , setting epoxy and three cherry (dovetail keys) aka bow ties or butterfly keys, sanding up to 320 grit silicone paper, extensive hand planning, card scrapping and some selective belt sanding, and finally, a hand rubber finish has been applied several times.

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After my mind flipping back and forth on doing a crazy bent lamination to look like cast iron. My smarter half really liked the two completely different X base tables I had done a few years ago. We found the perfect piece of walnut to do the entire table base from 2″ thick x 15″ x 7′ long. Then we found a second board from same stock for bench legs!

Walnut for table base
Walnut for table base

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I am on the finishing of legs now , then will get a little in depth here on how I attach the bases.

Replica Harley Davidson Evolution Engine by Brent – My Windsor Project Contest Entry

(This project was submitted by Brent on May 2nd , 2014)
I would like to submit my plywood project in the woodworking category.

 The plywood (3/4” Baltic birch) was purchased from your Coquitlam store as recommended by your employee Jordan.

 My project was used for my audition in HGTV’s Canada’s Handyman Challenge (Season 3) which I ultimately won.  The criteria for the audition was to make a project (of our choice) from one sheet of ¾” plywood, miscellaneous hardware was allowed.

The project is a full scale replica Harley Davidson Evolution engine.  It is accurate within millimeters of an actual engine and includes a working crankshaft, rod, and piston.  The piston includes rings that were removed from my motorcycle engine (after a recent rebuild) validating the accuracy of this build.  I would like to point out I am a HD Mechanic by trade and not a carpenter, there was a great deal of learning in this project.  The completed project consumed all but 2 square feet shown in the foreground of the photos.  I did not have the engine finished for the audition, I completed it after the competition was over.  I have invested just over 200 hours building this project.

 Regards

 Brent

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Above: Finished EVO Engine Right Hand Side

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Above: Finished EVO Engine Left Hand Side

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Above: Ignition cover

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Above: Finished EVO Engine Piston Cut Away

Moulding Winner of My Windsor Project Contest

Congratulations to:
Louwren from Grande Prairie, AB

My wife and I were not able to find an adequate entertainment centre to organize our TV, audio/video components, movies and games so I decided to try my hand at building a custom piece.  My previous experience with woodworking/construction was building a fence and framing the basement in a previous house we owned; items that didn’t require a lot of finesse in the build.  This was my first attempt at constructing a piece that needed to look nice!  After spending numerous hours viewing YouTube videos and creating a plan for the entertainment centre I started the build.

As you can see from the photos, the new entertainment centre is a built-in located in our family room and replaces our old Ikea TV stand, and provides additional storage and display space.  The new entertainment centre uses the following materials from Windsor Plywood in Grande Prairie:

· Birch ¾ Plywood – used to create the carcass of the cabinets and shelves

· Birch ½ plywood – used to build the drawers

· Maple boards – used to create the face frames and the storage doors frames

·  Beaded Wainscott – used for the background on the left and right shelving units, and the front of the storage doors

· Crown Molding – used along the top of the entertainment centre

·  Hinges – for the storage doors

· Money spent on these materials was $1,489.29

The entertainment centre was primed and painted with white melamine paint; the baseboard from the wall was used to wrap around the base of the entertainment centre.  Another feature of the entertainment centre is that I installed ABS piping under the left and right shelving units which opens up to the bottom shelve on the centre piece.  This allows speaker wire and the internet cable to be installed easily and makes wires readily available to the audio/video components without having to drill holes in the sides of centre (except for the outer sides of the unit).

Considering this was my first project of this type and scope it turned out very well.  (Even my wife would agree!)
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Winners-with-Darlene-of-GP-Photo-800Store employee Darlene, gives the prize to Louwrens and his son Tayben. Great job!

Woodworking Winner of the My Windsor Project Contest

Congratulations to:
Dennis of Armstrong, BC 

This highly detailed wooden bowl was turned by Dennis, a customer of Windsor Plywood Vernon store. The bowl is 14″ tall with main body made from Aspen with a ring of Blue Alowood. Inlay on the neck is Bubinga, Purpleheart and Blue Alowood.

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Dennis resides with his family in the beautiful Okanagan Valley in the interior of British Columbia. Shortly after retiring from a career as a Boilermaker Superintendent, Dennis decided to more actively pursue one of his many artistic hobbies, woodworking.  Soon afterwards, a neighbour introduced him to the art of turning bowls on a wood lathe.  Well a passion soon arose.  From simple solid piece bowls Dennis quickly moved on to designing more complex segmented bowls that allowed more of his artistic side to come through.

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Each and every bowl is a one-of-a-kind original creation.  Using a variety of the abundant local woods and some exotic woods blended together Dennis creates bowls with unique forms and colour matches.

Dennis Hassen 008When an interesting piece of wood presents itself, Dennis also turns solid piece bowls, trying best to exploit the natural grain and colour of the wood into an eye pleasing shape.

Once again, congratulations to Dennis and his fantastic project!

#beforeafter #picoftheday

The Age of the World’s Oldest Timber Constructions is Determined

December 20, 2012 – Story and images sourced from Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

Researchers have determined the age of the world’s oldest timber constructions: the 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig.

Scientists of the University of Freiburg document highly-developed construction techniques of wells built by early neolithic settlers.

A research team led by Willy Tegel and Dr. Dietrich Hakelbergfrom the Institute for Forest Growth of the University of Freiburg has succeeded in precisely dating four water wells built by the first Central European agricultural civilization with the help of dendrochronology or growth ring dating. The wells were excavated at settlements in the Greater Leipzig region and are the oldest known timber constructions in the world. They were built by the Linear Pottery culture, which existed from roughly 5600 to 4900 BC. The team’s findings, which have been published in the international scientific journal PLoS ONE, afford new insight into prehistoric technology. The study was conducted by archaeologists and dendrochronologists from the Institute for Forest Growth in Freiburg, the Archaeological Heritage Office of Saxony in Dresden, and the Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL in Birmensdorf, Switzerland.

Wells constructed from oak wood
The four early Neolithic wells were constructed from oak wood. In addition to the timber, many other waterlogged organic materials, such as plant remains, wooden artifacts, bark vessels, and bast fiber cords, as well as an array of richly decorated ceramic vessels, have survived for millennia hermetically sealed below groundwater level. With the help of dendrochronology, the scientists were able to determine the exact felling years of the trees and thus also the approximate time at which the wells were constructed. The tests revealed that the wood comes from massive old oak trees felled by early Neolithic farmers with stone adzes between the years of 5206 and 5098 BC. The farmers cleaved the trunks into boards, assembling them to make chest-like well linings with complex corner joints. Using state-of-the-art laser scanning technology, the scientists collected data on the timbers and tool marks and documented the highly developed woodworking skills of the early Neolithic settlers. The very well-preserved tool marks and timber joints testify to unexpectedly sophisticated timber construction techniques.

Developed woodworking technology enabled a sedentary lifestyle 

In the course of the sixth millennium BC, the nomadic hunting and gathering lifestyle gave way to a sedentary lifestyle with agriculture and stock breeding in Central Europe. This break in the history of mankind has been termed the “Neolithic Revolution.” A sedentary lifestyle required permanent housing, and houses are inconceivable without a developed woodworking technology – in other words, the first farmers were also the first carpenters. Until now, however, archaeologists have only succeeded in unearthing the soil marks left by their houses. The precisely dated wells will enable scientists to conduct more detailed studies on the important role of timber construction techniques for mankind’s adoption of a sedentary lifestyle.

Portrait

Willy Tegel und Dr. Dietrich Hakelberg

Willy Tegel und Dr. Dietrich Hakelberg are members of the Institute for Forest Growth at the University of Freiburg. Contact via phone: 0761 / 203-8591 or via E-Mail: tegel@dendro.de

Gallery

The well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig

The 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig during the excavation.
The 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig during the excavation. Ceramic finds in the backfill of the well.
Log construction of the 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig during the excavation.
The 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig during the excavation. Laser scanning image of the base frame with mortise and tenon corner joints: A projecting piece of wood is fed through a hole in the plank and secured with a wooden nail. Ceramic finds.
Base frame of the 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig during the excavation.
Laser scanning image of the base frame with the mortise and tenon corner joints of the 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig during the excavation. The corner joints consist of a projecting piece of wood fed through a hole in the plank and secured with a wooden nail.
Mortise and tenon corner joints and wooden nails from the 7000-year-old well of Altscherbitz near Leipzig. The corner joints consist of a projecting piece of wood fed through a hole in the plank and secured with a wooden nail.
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