Tag Archives: trim

Music and Craft Room Project by Selena – My Windsor Project Contest Entry

An room in our unfinished basement was finished to create a music/craft room.

Custom built-in shelves and curved desk were made out of 3/4″ melamine and trimmed with white iron-on melamine edging. A Kregg shelf pin jig was used to create custom shelf heights. The built-in shelving unit was trimmed with MDF mouldings – baseboard #514 for the two vertical pieces for the centre shelving section, S4S #MFSP105 & sash bead #9532 were used to create the custom header for the built-in shelves. Built-in shelf backer board was made out of particle/MDF board and painted a contrasting colour for a pop of colour.

The S4S #MFSP105 & sash bead #9532 mouldings were used to trim out the top of the doors (French & solid core).

1/2″ MDF was used to make a custom window sill and jambs for the window. The S4S #MFSP105 & sash bead #9532 mouldings were also used to trim out the top of the window.

Mouldings
Materials used:

– 1/2″ MDF (window sill and jambs)

– White iron-on melamine edging (used on all built in melamine shelves)

– 3/4″ melamine (for built in shelves and built desk)

– 11/16″ x 4-9/16″ (MFSP105) S4S MDF moulding

– 1/2″ x 1-3/8″ (9532) MDF sash bead moulding

– 1/2″ x 5-1/4″ (514) MDF baseboard moulding

– Particle/MDF board

– Shelf pins

– Kreg shelf pin jig

For the Doors

Materials used:

– 2 x 24 inch hollow core interior door (slabs)

– Pine door jamb

– 32 inch solid core interior door (pre hung)

– Door hinges

– Door lever style handles

– MDF moulding for finishing

Solid core doors was used as entrance door to a music room. Solid core door was used to reduce noise. Hollow core doors were hung (by us!) as French doors on closet. French doors allow easy access to musical instruments. Moulding was used to trim out doors.

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Moulding Winner of My Windsor Project Contest

Congratulations to:
Louwren from Grande Prairie, AB

My wife and I were not able to find an adequate entertainment centre to organize our TV, audio/video components, movies and games so I decided to try my hand at building a custom piece.  My previous experience with woodworking/construction was building a fence and framing the basement in a previous house we owned; items that didn’t require a lot of finesse in the build.  This was my first attempt at constructing a piece that needed to look nice!  After spending numerous hours viewing YouTube videos and creating a plan for the entertainment centre I started the build.

As you can see from the photos, the new entertainment centre is a built-in located in our family room and replaces our old Ikea TV stand, and provides additional storage and display space.  The new entertainment centre uses the following materials from Windsor Plywood in Grande Prairie:

· Birch ¾ Plywood – used to create the carcass of the cabinets and shelves

· Birch ½ plywood – used to build the drawers

· Maple boards – used to create the face frames and the storage doors frames

·  Beaded Wainscott – used for the background on the left and right shelving units, and the front of the storage doors

· Crown Molding – used along the top of the entertainment centre

·  Hinges – for the storage doors

· Money spent on these materials was $1,489.29

The entertainment centre was primed and painted with white melamine paint; the baseboard from the wall was used to wrap around the base of the entertainment centre.  Another feature of the entertainment centre is that I installed ABS piping under the left and right shelving units which opens up to the bottom shelve on the centre piece.  This allows speaker wire and the internet cable to be installed easily and makes wires readily available to the audio/video components without having to drill holes in the sides of centre (except for the outer sides of the unit).

Considering this was my first project of this type and scope it turned out very well.  (Even my wife would agree!)
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Louwrens-During-shot

Winners-with-Darlene-of-GP-Photo-800Store employee Darlene, gives the prize to Louwrens and his son Tayben. Great job!

How to Remove and Replace an Interior Door

The following video was created by the moulding and trim manufacturer, Metrie. Celebrity designer Amanda Forrest shows you how to take a functional feature like an interior door and transform it into an opportunity to add light and freshen up the style of your home. Amanda, with the help of contractor Geoff Hobson from Hobson Woodworks Inc., will show you the easy steps to removing and replacing a pre-hung interior door to update any room in your home.
Having problems, click here for the link to the YouTube video.

How to Measure Lumber (convert lineal feet to board feet)

14.6 Board feet of Santos Rosewood

14.6 Board foot of Santos Rosewood- One of the many exotic woods from Windsor

 

 

 

 

 

Hardwood mills sell their product by volume, not by length. The unit of measure is the “Board Foot”, which represents a surface area of one square foot, one inch thick.

 

To convert linear feet to board feet, use this formula:

Thickness (in inches) x Width (in inches) x Length (in inches)
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
144

Thickness

Thickness

Width

Width

Length

Length

 

Hardwood is normally measured in the rough before kiln drying and that measurement stays with it for life. Trimming and planning adds some waste and all lumber shrinks in kiln drying. The universally established practice is for the wholesaler to sell the lumber on the basis of adding an average allowance for the kiln drying to his own tally. The additional is usually 7%. When hardwood is sold at the retail level, this allowance is usually already included in the tally.

Sound confusing? It gets easier with practice. Why not drop into Windsor and try out your new found measuring skills. Windsor stocks a good supply of fine hardwoods.

example:
One board at 1” x 6” x 120″ = 5 board feet

eg: 1” x 6” x 120″
––––––––––––––––– = 5 BF
144

How to Install Mouldings

how-to-install-mouldingsNeed help with your moulding project? Not a problem. With a few “tricks of the trade” your room will look great!

• We recommend prefinishing the mouldings before installing
• Install the moulding piece by piece, working your way around the room, leaving the nail heads exposed to allow for any repositioning.
• Avoid nailing the last 2 to 3 inches in each piece to avoid splitting. Nail in the curved or cove part of the moulding to better hide the nail holes.
• Nail mouldings into wood studs or jambs. Any good quality finishing nail properly counter sunk works well.
• C-clamps should be used to secure the moulding in the mitre box for more accurate cuts. Always use scrap wood between the clamp and the moulding to prevent surface damage.

Check out Part 1 and Part 2 series of YouTube videos

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